New study sees 20-30% rise in heaviest US rainfalls with unabated CO2 by 2100. Related @dotearth post.

Expansive US drought is highlight in @NOAAncdc November climate roundup. More @dotearth.

Expansive US drought is highlight in @NOAAncdc November climate roundup. More @dotearth.

NOAA map: In warming climate, high-latitude growing season lengthening. From Climatewatch Magazine issue including more on extreme drought and other challenges: 
Few real-world signs of climate change are easier to read than changes in the growing season of familiar vegetation. From lilacs—which are flowering earlier—to allergy-causing ragweed—which is producing pollen longer into the fall, vegetation is reacting to Earth’s rising surface temperature. 
The map above shows changes in the length of the growing season in high northern latitudes based on satellite observations of vegetation “greenness” between 1982-2008. Green colors indicate places where the growing season increased by up to 2 days per year, while brown colors show places where the growing season became shorter by up to 2 days per year. 
Greens dominate the map, indicating that most of the high-latitudes are experiencing longer growing seasons now than they did more than two and half decades ago. In a few places, growing seasons appear to have expanded by up to almost 3 weeks. However, in some places, the growing season has become shorter.
Why are some places are bucking the overall trend toward longer growing seasons? Numerous local factors could be at play, including changes in the timing or amount of precipitation or the drying out of soil due to higher temperatures. 
More details about changes in Arctic and high-latitude vegetation can be found in Chapter 4 of the 2012 Arctic Report Card.

NOAA map: In warming climate, high-latitude growing season lengthening. From Climatewatch Magazine issue including more on extreme drought and other challenges

Few real-world signs of climate change are easier to read than changes in the growing season of familiar vegetation. From lilacs—which are flowering earlier—to allergy-causing ragweed—which is producing pollen longer into the fall, vegetation is reacting to Earth’s rising surface temperature. 

The map above shows changes in the length of the growing season in high northern latitudes based on satellite observations of vegetation “greenness” between 1982-2008. Green colors indicate places where the growing season increased by up to 2 days per year, while brown colors show places where the growing season became shorter by up to 2 days per year. 

Greens dominate the map, indicating that most of the high-latitudes are experiencing longer growing seasons now than they did more than two and half decades ago. In a few places, growing seasons appear to have expanded by up to almost 3 weeks. However, in some places, the growing season has become shorter.

Why are some places are bucking the overall trend toward longer growing seasons? Numerous local factors could be at play, including changes in the timing or amount of precipitation or the drying out of soil due to higher temperatures. 

More details about changes in Arctic and high-latitude vegetation can be found in Chapter 4 of the 2012 Arctic Report Card.

Gulf Coast Isaac targets face ocean-temperature roulette: Tropical cyclone heat potential in waters along storm track very low to east, higher west. Compare image above from NOAA Gulf ocean heat map to track forecast below.

Gulf Coast Isaac targets face ocean-temperature roulette: Tropical cyclone heat potential in waters along storm track very low to east, higher west. Compare image above from NOAA Gulf ocean heat map to track forecast below.

Isaac track forecast

Shades of ’30s as dry well blues spread (@nytimes) with >60% of US in drought.

Drought Map USGS

May @NOAA update: “warmest spring, warmest year-to-date, and warmest 12-month period the nation has experienced since recordkeeping began in 1895.” More…

May @NOAA update: “warmest spring, warmest year-to-date, and warmest 12-month period the nation has experienced since recordkeeping began in 1895.” More…

Via @sciencenow, new NOAA work shows ocean heating continued apace even as atmospheric warming “paused” of late. More support for tracking “global heating” instead of “global warming”?

Via @sciencenow, new NOAA work shows ocean heating continued apace even as atmospheric warming “paused” of late. More support for tracking “global heating” instead of “global warming”?

January temperatures and weather in the lower 48 states were far from normal — even as other parts of the Northern Hemisphere had (and continue to have) brutal wintry conditions. Here’s NOAA monthly summary for USA, with global summary coming next week.

January temperatures and weather in the lower 48 states were far from normal — even as other parts of the Northern Hemisphere had (and continue to have) brutal wintry conditions. Here’s NOAA monthly summary for USA, with global summary coming next week. Warm winter in US (cold elsewhere)

Mixed Hurricane Forecast

The hurricane season in the Atlantic Ocean should be more intense than normal while the Eastern and Central Pacific should have unusually quiet storm seasons, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration announced. Hurricanes on Dot Earth.