Rick Piltz of @govacctproj @climatesciwatch was potent force for limiting political efforts to torque science findings. Untimely passing.

Here he explains his role.

Here’s the first 2005 Times story built on docs he gave me.

Here’s my piece on the White House climate science editor (Phil Cooney) moving to ExxonMobil.

 Here’s our story on a 2007 House hearing on the climate documents and White House practices.

Birdwatching: Increasingly a moving target via global warming. Animated range map part of @AudubonSocity Birds & Climate Report.

Birdwatching: Increasingly a moving target via global warming. Animated range map part of @AudubonSocity Birds & Climate Report.

MIT ocean scientist clarifies findings on small net deep ocean cooling in a warming climate (in letter to editor following news story):

Understanding the ocean

THE article by Graham Lloyd will likely leave a mis-impression with many of your readers concerning the substance of our paper that will appear in the Journal of Physical Oceanography (“Puzzle of deep ocean cooling”, 25/7).

We never assert that global warming and warming of the oceans are not occurring — we do find an ocean warming, particularly in the upper regions.

Contrary to the implications of Lloyd’s article, parts of the deep ocean are warming, parts are cooling, and although the global abyssal average is negative, the value is tiny in a global warming context.

Those parts of the abyss that are warming are most directly linked to the surface (as pointed out by Andy Hogg from the ANU).

Scientifically, we need to better understand what is going on everywhere, and that is an issue oceanographers must address over the next few years — a challenging observational problem that our paper is intended to raise.

Carl Wunsch, Harvard University and Massachusetts, Institute of Technology

In @newyorker, @nijhuism points to studies showing story beats data in conveying climate change calamity. But African example problematic. Enormous implicit variability and clashing models mean local narratives of change/hardship are not valid reflection of greenhouse-driven climate change. See here, here and here. Sub-Saharan Africa response to greenhouse forcing still unclear:

(see @dotearth post)

yearsoflivingdangerously:

This comic was produced in partnership by Years of Living Dangerously and Symbolia Magazine. For more amazing real life comics, get Symbolia on your iPad or via PDF. And for more information on the biggest story of our time - check out YEARS.

Good @elikint piece on how government cuts in IPCC summary left authors shell-shocked. (One excised graph above.) David Victor, a lead author from UCSD:
“The whole process is kind of unbelievable,” Victor says. As one of the report’s lead authors, he was in the middle of the negotiations. The outcome raises “fundamental questions about whether the IPCC can really do policy-related assessments in areas where the science is most germane to policy,” he writes in an e-mail. “There has always been a tension between the scientific content and the political approval of IPCC reports. But on the scientific issues that probably matter most to policymakers—such as which kinds of countries cause most emissions, who will bear the greatest burdens in controlling emissions, or how international trade affects emissions and policies—the pendulum has swung strongly toward the governments.”
This Dot Earth post is highly relevant: “Nations’ Handling of New Climate Report Presages Divisions in Treaty Effort.”

Good @elikint piece on how government cuts in IPCC summary left authors shell-shocked. (One excised graph above.) David Victor, a lead author from UCSD:

“The whole process is kind of unbelievable,” Victor says. As one of the report’s lead authors, he was in the middle of the negotiations. The outcome raises “fundamental questions about whether the IPCC can really do policy-related assessments in areas where the science is most germane to policy,” he writes in an e-mail. “There has always been a tension between the scientific content and the political approval of IPCC reports. But on the scientific issues that probably matter most to policymakers—such as which kinds of countries cause most emissions, who will bear the greatest burdens in controlling emissions, or how international trade affects emissions and policies—the pendulum has swung strongly toward the governments.”

This Dot Earth post is highly relevant: “Nations’ Handling of New Climate Report Presages Divisions in Treaty Effort.”

@KeithKloor weighs in on @RogerPielkeJr flogging. All happening on a tiny corner (attribution debate) of the head of a pin called climate change discourse. All serving those hoping the public stays confused about climate consensus. Rope-a-dope.

Useful @natureclimate commentaries on warming hiatus, flawed 2-degree threshold, etc., below. More on “The Two-Degree Solution" from @dotearth.

  • Pause for thought

    The recent slowdown (or ‘pause’) in global surface temperature rise is a hot topic for climate scientists and the wider public. We discuss how climate scientists have tried to communicate the pause and suggest that ‘many-to-many’ communication offers a key opportunity to directly engage with the public.

    • Ed Hawkins,
    • Tamsin Edwards &
    • Doug McNeall
  • Media discourse on the climate slowdown

    We must not fall victim to decontextualized and ahistorical media accounting of climate trends.

    • Maxwell T. Boykoff
  • Heat hide and seek

    Natural variability can explain fluctuations in surface temperatures but can it account for the current slowdown in warming?

    • Lisa Goddard
  • No pause in the increase of hot temperature extremes

    Observational data show a continued increase of hot extremes over land during the so-called global warming hiatus. This tendency is greater for the most extreme events and thus more relevant for impacts than changes in global mean temperature.

    • Sonia I. Seneviratne,
    • Markus G. Donat,
    • Brigitte Mueller &
    • Lisa V. Alexander
  • The climate policy narrative for a dangerously warming world

    It is time to acknowledge that global average temperatures are likely to rise above the 2 °C policy target and consider how that deeply troubling prospect should affect priorities for communicating and managing the risks of a dangerously warming climate.

    • Todd Sanford,
    • Peter C. Frumhoff,
    • Amy Luers &
    • Jay Gulledge
Anthony Watts, the climate skeptic blogger, asked me to comment on a cartoon published online by The Times exploring ways to use the 2014 “icicle surplus” and including this one. Here’s what I told him:
I find the final panel in this cartoon on uses for surplus icicles to be the antithesis of humor. But some artists, like some bloggers, seem to thrive on edge pushing. Andres Serrano (“Immersion: Piss Cross”) comes to mind. There are many others. We are quite a species.
Updated, 2:47 p.m. | It’s worth saying more. This cartoon is right up there with the “pretty edgy” 2010 climate-campaign video showing a teacher blowing up students who didn’t sign on to cut their carbon footprints.
Both are great attention getters, and were utterly stupid if the goal was do accomplish anything other than inflaming and dividing people on an important issue. And that would be a reprehensible goal.

Anthony Watts, the climate skeptic blogger, asked me to comment on a cartoon published online by The Times exploring ways to use the 2014 “icicle surplus” and including this one. Here’s what I told him:

I find the final panel in this cartoon on uses for surplus icicles to be the antithesis of humor. But some artists, like some bloggers, seem to thrive on edge pushing. Andres Serrano (“Immersion: Piss Cross”) comes to mind. There are many others. We are quite a species.

Updated, 2:47 p.m. | It’s worth saying more. This cartoon is right up there with the “pretty edgy” 2010 climate-campaign video showing a teacher blowing up students who didn’t sign on to cut their carbon footprints.

Both are great attention getters, and were utterly stupid if the goal was do accomplish anything other than inflaming and dividing people on an important issue. And that would be a reprehensible goal.

Diplomacy? Sec. Kerry pushes Indonesia to decarbonize as USA energy use emits 17.2 tons CO2/person/yr., Indonesia 1.8. Quote: “It’s not enough for one country or even a few countries to reduce their emissions when other countries continue to fill the atmosphere with carbon pollution as they see fit.” More on Dot Earth.