. &  should do  video of @BarackObama #Keystone@NYGovCuomo #fracking policy race.

Congo successfully deploys dog teams to sniff out bushmeat. @thewcs (PALF photos). (Works at JFK Airport, too.) More from Wildlife Conservation Society:

 

NEW YORK (April 3, 2014) – The Wildlife Conservation Society reports a major seizure of illegal bushmeat in Congo at Maya Maya International Airport in Brazzaville when authorities recently confiscated approximately 40 animals including monkeys, antelope, and porcupine.

In an unrelated incident, two bushmeat traffickers were arrested transporting 30 carcasses of similar wildlife through the Mila Mila area of Niari. The traffickers are currently awaiting trial.

The seizure and arrests were assisted by PALF (Project for the Application of Law for Fauna – Republic of Congo), a pioneering partnership of the Wildlife Conservation Society and the Aspinall Foundation and supported by the USFWS that is committed to ending wildlife trafficking in Congo.

Conservationists report that recent infrastructure improvements such as better roads and transportation hubs in Congo have resulted in an uptick in illegal hunting and trafficking of protected species.  In addition, traffickers are resorting to threateningwildlife authorities and PALF members in an effort to scare local authorities.

“PALF’s work to stop illegal wildlife trafficking by improving Congo’s legal system is more important than ever,” said James Deutsch, WCS Executive Director for Africa Programs.  “Illegal wildlife trafficking has the potential to strip mine Congo of its world class wildlife and natural heritage.  Only through tough law enforcement and stopping corruption can trafficking be eliminated.”

To aid in future enforcement efforts, PALF launched a sniffer dog program last month that works with local authorities to detect illegal wildlife products including ivory being transported within the country and internationally.

@KeithKloor weighs in on @RogerPielkeJr flogging. All happening on a tiny corner (attribution debate) of the head of a pin called climate change discourse. All serving those hoping the public stays confused about climate consensus. Rope-a-dope.

Leadership positions open at @World_Wildlife as it seeks to “freeze the footprint of food by doubling net food availability.” More from the .org here:

This signals a strategy that focuses on productivity, efficiency and sustainable intensification, but also on reducing waste, changing consumption patterns and addressing food security issues. 

Toward these ends, we are creating a new Food team and two senior positions that do not exist in any other environmental organization. We have created a new SVP position to lead our Food work. We have also created a new VP position for Animal Protein given that that is the fastest growing area of food consumption globally. These are exciting new positions. And, we want to find the right person to fill each of them. A summary of the profile for each position follows.

Senior Vice President, Food
WWF’s Senior Vice President (SVP), Food is responsible for setting short- and long-term strategic direction for the Food Goal and is accountable for outcomes that move the needle in this area. The Food SVP will ensure that the right resources are brought to bear in several transformational initiatives.  S/he is recognized both internally and externally as a leading expert in the field and will be called upon to bring the latest thinking and innovation to solve complex problems and to influence and leverage the strategies of partners in this space. In addition to strategy development, the Food SVP is responsible for implementation for WWF-US’ Food work, building and managing a diverse team working towards a common vision and objectives, and undertaking fundraising and communication efforts. 

Vice President, Animal Protein
The Vice President (VP), Animal Protein will oversee WWF’s work to  eliminate or measurably reduce or mitigate the key threats caused by the single most significant driver of biodiversity loss globally, the production of animal protein. The Animal Protein VP will be responsible for strategy development and delivery for WWF-US’ work on beef, dairy, aquaculture and other key animal proteins (e.g. poultry, eggs, pork) ; aligning WWF’s animal protein work  with its work to reduce the impacts of producing animal feed; building and managing a diverse with a large number of partners working towards a common vision with regard to animal protein issues; working with the Food SVP to engage key animal protein audiences; and supporting and/or undertaking communications and fundraising efforts. 

If you are interested in learning more about either of these positions, please visit the WWF Careers page: http://worldwildlife.org/about/careers. Also, please feel free to forward this information to anyone you think would be a good fit for either of these exciting new WWF positions.

Leadership positions open at @World_Wildlife as it seeks to “freeze the footprint of food by doubling net food availability.” More from the .org here:

This signals a strategy that focuses on productivity, efficiency and sustainable intensification, but also on reducing waste, changing consumption patterns and addressing food security issues. 

Toward these ends, we are creating a new Food team and two senior positions that do not exist in any other environmental organization. We have created a new SVP position to lead our Food work. We have also created a new VP position for Animal Protein given that that is the fastest growing area of food consumption globally. These are exciting new positions. And, we want to find the right person to fill each of them. A summary of the profile for each position follows.

Senior Vice President, Food

WWF’s Senior Vice President (SVP), Food is responsible for setting short- and long-term strategic direction for the Food Goal and is accountable for outcomes that move the needle in this area. The Food SVP will ensure that the right resources are brought to bear in several transformational initiatives.  S/he is recognized both internally and externally as a leading expert in the field and will be called upon to bring the latest thinking and innovation to solve complex problems and to influence and leverage the strategies of partners in this space. In addition to strategy development, the Food SVP is responsible for implementation for WWF-US’ Food work, building and managing a diverse team working towards a common vision and objectives, and undertaking fundraising and communication efforts. 

Vice President, Animal Protein

The Vice President (VP), Animal Protein will oversee WWF’s work to  eliminate or measurably reduce or mitigate the key threats caused by the single most significant driver of biodiversity loss globally, the production of animal protein. The Animal Protein VP will be responsible for strategy development and delivery for WWF-US’ work on beef, dairy, aquaculture and other key animal proteins (e.g. poultry, eggs, pork) ; aligning WWF’s animal protein work  with its work to reduce the impacts of producing animal feed; building and managing a diverse with a large number of partners working towards a common vision with regard to animal protein issues; working with the Food SVP to engage key animal protein audiences; and supporting and/or undertaking communications and fundraising efforts. 

If you are interested in learning more about either of these positions, please visit the WWF Careers page: http://worldwildlife.org/about/careers. Also, please feel free to forward this information to anyone you think would be a good fit for either of these exciting new WWF positions.

Useful @natureclimate commentaries on warming hiatus, flawed 2-degree threshold, etc., below. More on “The Two-Degree Solution" from @dotearth.

  • Pause for thought

    The recent slowdown (or ‘pause’) in global surface temperature rise is a hot topic for climate scientists and the wider public. We discuss how climate scientists have tried to communicate the pause and suggest that ‘many-to-many’ communication offers a key opportunity to directly engage with the public.

    • Ed Hawkins,
    • Tamsin Edwards &
    • Doug McNeall
  • Media discourse on the climate slowdown

    We must not fall victim to decontextualized and ahistorical media accounting of climate trends.

    • Maxwell T. Boykoff
  • Heat hide and seek

    Natural variability can explain fluctuations in surface temperatures but can it account for the current slowdown in warming?

    • Lisa Goddard
  • No pause in the increase of hot temperature extremes

    Observational data show a continued increase of hot extremes over land during the so-called global warming hiatus. This tendency is greater for the most extreme events and thus more relevant for impacts than changes in global mean temperature.

    • Sonia I. Seneviratne,
    • Markus G. Donat,
    • Brigitte Mueller &
    • Lisa V. Alexander
  • The climate policy narrative for a dangerously warming world

    It is time to acknowledge that global average temperatures are likely to rise above the 2 °C policy target and consider how that deeply troubling prospect should affect priorities for communicating and managing the risks of a dangerously warming climate.

    • Todd Sanford,
    • Peter C. Frumhoff,
    • Amy Luers &
    • Jay Gulledge

Diplomacy? Sec. Kerry pushes Indonesia to decarbonize as USA energy use emits 17.2 tons CO2/person/yr., Indonesia 1.8. Quote: “It’s not enough for one country or even a few countries to reduce their emissions when other countries continue to fill the atmosphere with carbon pollution as they see fit.” More on Dot Earth.

Can’t wait to track onstage @greenbiz meetup of @Greenpeace & @AsianPulpPaper. (@DotEarth background on pulp fight.) Here’s what’s coming, via Joel @Makower:

The next GreenBiz Forum will examine ”how NGOs and companies interact, in a number of sessions. At the event, we’ll be launching the ‘GreenBiz NGO Report,’ the first annual rating by companies of environmental nonprofits. It will assess which ones are the most credible and the most effective, from the viewpoint of several hundred companies we’ve surveyed.

"We’ll bring that report to life with a panel featuring senior leaders at three NGOs spanning the spectrum of activism, from collaborative (Environmental Defense Fund) to confrontational (Greenpeace). There will also be a mainstage conversation among Asia Pulp & Paper, Greenpeace, and The Forest Trust, which culminated an adversarial campaign one year ago with a breakthrough agreement. (Learn more in this week’s Exit Interview with outgoing Greenpeace USA executive director Phil Radford.)

"There’s more: Neil Hawkins from Dow will discuss it’s partnership with The Nature Conservancy; separately, TNC’s head, Mark Tercek, will talk about its work with Dow and other companies on biodiversity and business opportunity. And a number of other sessions will feature NGO-company partnerships.

"Clearly, these relationships are going to be around for a while, so we might as well get good at them."

My thoughts on @HuffPostPol @InformationDk reports on NSA spying on #COP15 climate talks:

It’s very revealing and important reporting, but I can’t see how this additional intelligence - as the Information.dk story suggests - “may have contributed to the Americans getting their way…

That implies that the U.S. did get its way. 

To me, it still seems clear that China, with India and others, were far more adept than the United States at manipulating the proceedings to guarantee no shift toward a binding global commitment to decarbonization. Read Mark Lynas and Der Spiegel.

Can anyone imagine why President Obama would have committed to going to the meeting in person if the administration knew the outcome would be weak gruel? 

Relevant posts:

Climate Talks Make Way for a Design Show

Views on China’s Role in the Greenhouse

Postscript 3: Lisa Friedman has an excellent Climate Wire piece noting how inconsequential any NSA monitoring was even if it ended up taking place. Yvo de Boer makes a good point in that piece: ”There is a much bigger debate going on about who is spying on who. But in the climate change negotiations, we should be very much focused on looking forward and building trust, not looking back, not on rehashing things that may or may not have happened in the past,” he said.

Postscript 2: Angel Hsu at Yale, via Twitter (@ecoangelhsu), disagreed with my conclusion about who won and lost in Copenhagen. Read here.

Postscript 1: I do agree with Alden Meyer’s concerns about how these revelations will chill dialogue going forward. Even worse odds for significant steps in Paris in 2015.

Young Hong Kongers (@hk4elephants) press for more action to end ivory trade. wildaid​ @avaaz

Young Hong Kongers (@hk4elephants) press for more action to end ivory trade. wildaid​ @avaaz

No idea why some claim this @dotearth line vanished: ”[I]t’s counterproductive to blur lines between observations based on science and values-based views on solutions.