Young Hong Kongers (@hk4elephants) press for more action to end ivory trade. wildaid​ @avaaz

Young Hong Kongers (@hk4elephants) press for more action to end ivory trade. wildaid​ @avaaz

Pre-arrest, alleged tiger trafficker in Indonesia shows off his wares. News via @TheWCS: NEW YORK (January 7, 2014) — The Wildlife Conservation Society congratulates the Aceh Police for smashing a major network of wildlife traffickers. The traffickers allegedly ran five tiger poaching gangs in the Blangkenjeran, Gayo Lues, Takengon, and Ulu Masen forest areas. The two suspects, who were caught with a variety of illegal wildlife including stuffed Sumatran tigers and other rare cats, are allegedly connected with a known tiger kingpin operating in Medan.

The arrests took place in Takengon, in Indonesia’s Aceh Province and were supported by Aceh Police under command of Criminal Investigation Director Joko Irwanto along with Lieutenant General Suhardi Alius of the Criminal Investigation Division National Police in Jakarta.  

WCS’s Wildlife Crimes Unit (WCU) assisted in the case. The WCU operates in Indonesia providing data and technical advice to law enforcement agencies to support the investigation and prosecution of wildlife crimes.

Along with the stuffed tigers, the police confiscated body parts from globally endangered species including, sun bears, golden cats, marbled cats, a clouded leopard, Sumatran serow, as well as leopard cats, and some birds.

Said Joe Walston, WCS Executive Director for Asia Programs: “This recent arrest shows that Indonesia is getting increasingly serious about not tolerating wildlife crime, which threaten its spectacular natural heritage. We congratulate the group of law enforcement professionals that worked together on a local, regional, and national level to make this important arrest happen.” 

Dr. Noviar Andayani, Director of the WCS-Indonesia Program said: “WCS’s Wildlife Crimes Unit continues to work with Indonesian authorities to make a difference.  We are hopeful that the message is getting out that if you violate wildlife laws in Indonesia, you will be caught and prosecuted.”

Last year, a military court in Takengon handed down the first-ever successful prosecutions of wildlife crimes in Aceh Province to two wildlife traffickers convicted of possessing a pair of stuffed Sumatran tigers and one stuffed sun bear. This marked only the second prosecution for wildlife crimes prosecuted by an Indonesian military court. The suspects were arrested by Takengon’s military police after a three-month investigation.

WCS’s efforts to combat wildlife trafficking in Indonesia are made possible through support from the Liz Claiborne and Art Ortenberg Foundation and the Association of Zoos and Aquariums’ Tiger Species Survival Plan® Program’s Tiger Conservation Campaign.

Pre-arrest, alleged tiger trafficker in Indonesia shows off his wares. News via @TheWCS: NEW YORK (January 7, 2014— The Wildlife Conservation Society congratulates the Aceh Police for smashing a major network of wildlife traffickers. The traffickers allegedly ran five tiger poaching gangs in the Blangkenjeran, Gayo Lues, Takengon, and Ulu Masen forest areas. The two suspects, who were caught with a variety of illegal wildlife including stuffed Sumatran tigers and other rare cats, are allegedly connected with a known tiger kingpin operating in Medan.

The arrests took place in Takengon, in Indonesia’s Aceh Province and were supported by Aceh Police under command of Criminal Investigation Director Joko Irwanto along with Lieutenant General Suhardi Alius of the Criminal Investigation Division National Police in Jakarta.  

WCS’s Wildlife Crimes Unit (WCU) assisted in the case. The WCU operates in Indonesia providing data and technical advice to law enforcement agencies to support the investigation and prosecution of wildlife crimes.

Along with the stuffed tigers, the police confiscated body parts from globally endangered species including, sun bears, golden cats, marbled cats, a clouded leopard, Sumatran serow, as well as leopard cats, and some birds.

Said Joe Walston, WCS Executive Director for Asia Programs: “This recent arrest shows that Indonesia is getting increasingly serious about not tolerating wildlife crime, which threaten its spectacular natural heritage. We congratulate the group of law enforcement professionals that worked together on a local, regional, and national level to make this important arrest happen.” 

Dr. Noviar Andayani, Director of the WCS-Indonesia Program said: “WCS’s Wildlife Crimes Unit continues to work with Indonesian authorities to make a difference.  We are hopeful that the message is getting out that if you violate wildlife laws in Indonesia, you will be caught and prosecuted.”

Last year, a military court in Takengon handed down the first-ever successful prosecutions of wildlife crimes in Aceh Province to two wildlife traffickers convicted of possessing a pair of stuffed Sumatran tigers and one stuffed sun bear. This marked only the second prosecution for wildlife crimes prosecuted by an Indonesian military court. The suspects were arrested by Takengon’s military police after a three-month investigation.

WCS’s efforts to combat wildlife trafficking in Indonesia are made possible through support from the Liz Claiborne and Art Ortenberg Foundation and the Association of Zoos and Aquariums’ Tiger Species Survival Plan® Program’s Tiger Conservation Campaign.

Can consumers in China and Vietnam (where rhino horn is a club drug!) outgrow taste for rhino horn? Jackie Chan is trying to help. (photo by Vern Evans for WildAid)

Can consumers in China and Vietnam (where rhino horn is a club drug!) outgrow taste for rhino horn? Jackie Chan is trying to help. (photo by Vern Evans for WildAid)

New @gettleman @tylerhicksphoto @nytimes piece on African elephanticide- focus on Gabon. Aided by oil wealth, the country tries to stem ivory poaching tide, but elephants are still falling.

New @gettleman @tylerhicksphoto @nytimes piece on African elephanticide- focus on Gabon. Aided by oil wealth, the country tries to stem ivory poaching tide, but elephants are still falling.

Potent piece finds only way to blunt elephant and human death toll in poaching wars is to cut ivory demand. Art by Ellen Weinstein. More on ivory wars on Dot Earth.

Potent piece finds only way to blunt elephant and human death toll in poaching wars is to cut ivory demand. Art by Ellen Weinstein. More on ivory wars on Dot Earth.

Stunning image, context: Elephant Drinking, Amboseli, 2007. Killed by Poachers, 2009. @biglifeafrica @safaritalk (© Nick Brandt 2011)

Stunning image, context: Elephant Drinking, Amboseli, 2007. Killed by Poachers, 2009. @biglifeafrica @safaritalk (© Nick Brandt 2011)

Setback for @WildlifeWorks as Somali elephant poachers kill ranger, badly wound 2nd. Video of rangers at work. News release:

Read More

Rare good rhino news (from Nepal). Via WWF: Nepal celebrates year without rhino poaching: Nepal marked 2011 as a landmark year for conservation as not a single rhino in the country was lost to poaching. With record numbers of rhinos continuing to be poached globally for their horns, particularly in South Africa where 448 were killed in 2011, this announcement is welcomed news to the conservation community. (Photo © Sameer Singh / WWF Nepal)
“This is the first time in 29 years that Nepal has gone an entire year without a single poached rhino, and it’s a testament to the efforts of the Government of Nepal, WWF and many partners,” said Barney Long, Asian species expert at WWF. “We hope the new year will bring additional good news from other countries like South Africa as they continue to crack down on rhino poaching.”

The Government of Nepal, WWF and local conservation organizations marked the occasion with a celebration on Saturday in Chitwan National Park, where the majority of the country’s rhinos live. In order to continue combating poaching and illegal wildlife trade effectively, WWF also announced at the event to support the establishment of an interrogation center in Chitwan National Park through a WWF tiger initiative.

Nepal is home to around 534 greater one-horned rhinos. Considered vulnerable by the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species, these rhinos number around 2,900 in Nepal and India. Their numbers continue to decline as the result of poaching and habitat loss. Greater one-horned rhinos are the most numerous of the three Asian rhino species.

Rare good rhino news (from Nepal). Via WWF: Nepal celebrates year without rhino poaching: Nepal marked 2011 as a landmark year for conservation as not a single rhino in the country was lost to poaching. With record numbers of rhinos continuing to be poached globally for their horns, particularly in South Africa where 448 were killed in 2011, this announcement is welcomed news to the conservation community. (Photo © Sameer Singh / WWF Nepal)

“This is the first time in 29 years that Nepal has gone an entire year without a single poached rhino, and it’s a testament to the efforts of the Government of Nepal, WWF and many partners,” said Barney Long, Asian species expert at WWF. “We hope the new year will bring additional good news from other countries like South Africa as they continue to crack down on rhino poaching.”

The Government of Nepal, WWF and local conservation organizations marked the occasion with a celebration on Saturday in Chitwan National Park, where the majority of the country’s rhinos live. In order to continue combating poaching and illegal wildlife trade effectively, WWF also announced at the event to support the establishment of an interrogation center in Chitwan National Park through a WWF tiger initiative.

Nepal is home to around 534 greater one-horned rhinos. Considered vulnerable by the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species, these rhinos number around 2,900 in Nepal and India. Their numbers continue to decline as the result of poaching and habitat loss. Greater one-horned rhinos are the most numerous of the three Asian rhino species.

Terrible year for elephants. Huge rise in big ivory seizures = ~2500 killed animals. @traffic_WLTrade for more. Release here.

Terrible year for elephants. Huge rise in big ivory seizures = ~2500 killed animals. @traffic_WLTrade for more. Release here.

South Africa has lost > 287 rhinos in 2011 - 16 of them critically endangered black rhinos. Dr Joseph Okori, head of WWF’s Rhino Programme in Africa, talks about the African rhino poaching crisis.